In His Image …Rant

The great creator of the entire universe formed man in His image. No other living being shared that honor. No we weren’t made of slime plus time, nor were we descended from apes. Even though sometimes we act like we were. There is a fear in all other creatures of humans because of the image of God reflected in us. It’s inconceivable that we should make light of this by portraying dumb animals as somehow being capable of reason and speech as man does. It is incredibly insulting to a holy God, after He gave us the exclusive privilege of being created in His image.
All the computing power in the 1st space ship that went to the moon was less than the IPhone that I carry in my back pocket has. In the same way, the smartest dog in the world doesn’t even come close to the reasoning power of my 3year old grandson.
Christians should be to ashamed to pay money to see animals that can talk and reason like men. Patronizing these fairy stories is reinforcing the myth of evolution. Right from the start, God created us uniquely to all creation. What fools we have become. Any idiot can see that animals are a world apart from mankind, yet we perpetuate a lie. We need to grow up and stop excusing make believe stories as just entertainment when really it’s an affront to God.
Many years ago I worked as a mall Santa. One day it dawned on me that I was lying to every kid that sat on my knee. I repented. I wore my Santa suit home and took it off before my own children, so they could see that Santa was really a fake.
I watched a few minutes of a movie touted as a Christian classic where some kids went into a closet and came out the other side to a world where animals talked and were human like. The story became more and more ridiculous as the author attempted to twist God’s order. It was a blatant mockery of God’s creation. What was the writer thinking? Some Christians are unbelievably naive of what the devil is doing in this world. Isn’t there enough insanity and unreality in this world without Christians writing make believe stories. Satin would like to keep us dumbed down by having us play trivial mind games and live in an illusionary world. Its ok for children to pretend in their play, but when they grow up, we hope they will take life more seriously.
Peter Pan was the boy that never wanted to grow up. Unfortunately much of christendom has subscribed to the same spirit. 1cor. 13:11 comes to mind…
When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I gave up childish ways.

2 thoughts on “In His Image …Rant

  1. Hey Bill,

    I just stumbled upon your blog, and have enjoyed reading many well written posts over the last couple of hours! This one struck my interest in particular, as the interaction of the church and science is something dear to my heart.

    You seem to be reducing “The Image of God” down to intelligence and rationality, whereas I see it as so much more than that. The “Image of God” is a cornerstone in Christian theology, and many Christians see this as incompatible with evolution. Often we define our “humanness” as a differentiation from other animals. For instance, our ability to reason, think rationally, communicate through language, perform mathematics, etc., is commonly used as a defense for what makes us superior to other animals. However, communication and rationality are something that we observe in the animal kingdom frequently. Malcolm Jeeves, a Christian neuroscientist, once wrote that “any attempt to set down a clear demarcation between the reasoning abilities of nonhuman primates and humans is found to have become blurred.” In addition, portraying “the Image of God” as our human abilities seems to belittle this idea. Aquinas argues that intelligence as an “aptitude for understanding and loving God”, and that our capacity to have a relationship with God is what makes us made in the “Image of God.”

    There are other theological interpretations for what “The Image of God” means, but I am no theologian, so I will not pretend to be one! However, I will say that this does not clash with evolutionary theory, nor should it be a stumbling block between a Christian and science. Evolution is a means by which God can providentially achieve his purpose of creation. God created humanity through the process of evolution and bestowed His image upon us, through a creation process in the physical, and the spiritual.

    In regards to your “slime plus time” argument, I would say that God started from dust – much harder than slime! Evolution is a model for the history of life, not a replacement for God in the creation story. Moreover, it is a fantastically complex description of the tool God used to create life.

    I should cite here, and say that a majority of my quotes and lines of thinking here are derived from http://biologos.org/ (an amazing website for Christians dealing with the interface of their theology and evolution.)

    Blessings,

    Fraser

    • I agree with you about the image of God. It has more to do with our capacity for relationship with God than our intellectual capacity above animals.
      However, for what reason would you subscribe to the theory of evolution as a mechanism for creation? Is it because science seems to prove the theory of evolution beyond reasonable doubt, and you can see a way that scripture can mesh with evolution with only inconsequential modifications to either view?

      I am not a scientist. I only have a degree in biology. But I have done a great deal of research and reading on the matter, and I have come to the conclusion that the major claims of evolutionary theory are simply impossible biologically. I also feel that evolutionary biologists practice somewhat of a pseudo science, or at least they practice at a lower calibre of scientific inquiry than other disciplines, and they only get their claims accepted by the majority of scientists in other fields because of a philosophical need by the general populace to find a theory that allows them to reject the possibility of a God.
      With this in mind, it strikes me as absolute foolishness when Christians attempt to make Christianity and evolution work together. Secular evolutionists scoff at such attempts to combine the two… since the very reason they hold to biological evolution is that they have rejected the notion of anything supernatural out of hand. As soon as you accept that there is a Source, or a God who created out of nothing, evolution becomes devoid of it’s power to explain this world.
      Christians who accept “evolutionary creation” generally believe that it would deny the character of God to create a world as-it-is, with an apparent age built in. I would argue that on two counts they are way off base. To start with I feel their interpretation of scientific facts is false (and yes, there is a great deal of interpretation in science, contrary to what popular science tells us). It seems to me that most of the science pointing to an old earth is shaky at best. Secondly, I feel that scripture teaches about a God whose character is such that He routinely supersedes the natural laws He has set in motion. We see this in nearly every book of the Bible. To me, the very act of sustaining His creation or even allowing anything to exist at all, is directly opposite to natural law or scientific inquiry or any sort of human reason.
      Christians, I believe, have tried to incorporate evolutionary theory into our worldview out of fear of rejection or marginalization by an increasingly secular society. We have abandoned both sound science and sound theology in order to become attractive to our pagan neighbours. In doing so we have lost a great opportunity to suffer for the sake of Christ. We needn’t make creationism a cornerstone of our communications with the world; we needn’t even bother arguing it for the most part; but we certainly should hold to it out of a reverence for God-breathed scripture and an acknowledgement of the limitations of science. And if that brings some persecution, so be it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s